To all our current and prospective clients: In light of the National Emergency, our office will still be operational from either our office or remotely depending on the status of events. Either way, we still answer all of our calls directly 24/7. The best way to get a hold of us would be through our office number (951) 686-4818 or email (kia@kialaw.com). Our day-to-day operations depend on the safety of our staff and the courts being open for business. Feel free to reach out to us to inquire about your case or discuss any new cases with Mr. Feyzjou at the number above. Stay safe and we remain hopeful that this too shall pass with everyone’s health and safety in mind.

I Borrowed My Brother’s Car And Got Arrested For Driving A Stolen Car

It’s not uncommon to borrow another person’s car. We’ve all been there. Whether you don’t own a car at all, or your vehicle is at the mechanic’s getting a tune up, or you’re asked to transport a family member’s car for one reason or another, we have all driven a car that didn’t legally belong to us. Is there any reason for this and could you be arrested for driving a stolen car if you do?

Defining Theft

Theft is a term used broadly to refer to crimes encompassing the taking of a person’s property without their permission to do so. However, the legal meaning of the word may involve more than one category, and varying degrees, of crimes. Theft is usually described as the unauthorized taking of property from another with the intention keeping it from that person permanently. There are two key aspects of this definition:

  • Taking of another person’s possession
  • Intent to permanently deprive the victim of said possession

Degrees of Theft

Although it may seem simple enough, the law actually recognizes many degrees of theft. For instance, a third degree theft could be a misdemeanor, which involves property of little market value. In another instance, a first degree theft might be defined as a felony with stolen property evaluated higher than a limit set by regulations. Also, certain states classify theft as “petty” or “grand”. Some degrees of theft are:

Can you be charged with theft if you had permission to drive the car?

It’s likely this could all be cleared up with a statement from your brother, who loaned you the car, or by presenting documentation you have: a text message, voice mail, hand-written note or verbal statement. An experienced attorney who clearly understands California laws regarding theft can be exactly the person you want on your side to get you out of hot water!

California Car Theft Lawyer

If you have been accused or, investigated for, or charged with automobile theft, petty theft, grand theft, burglary or other theft charge, connect with an attorney to make sure that your legal rights are being aggressively defended. We have extensive experience in having charges dropped, sentences reduced and jail avoided. Contact Kia Law today

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